YLD to Elect 7 to Executive Committee; Vote Today at Bellevue

Ten candidates are running for seven seats on the Young Lawyers Division Executive Committee in the Tuesday, Dec. 9 election....READ MORE

Public Interest Law Day CLE, Reception Dec. 10

The Public Interest Section will present its Annual Public Interest Law Day CLE program on Wednesday, Dec. 10 with an array of hot topics in public interest law for public interest attorneys, pro bono practitioners, judges and private practice attorneys who are interested in learning more about public interest law and cutting-edge issues affecting the pro bono legal community...READ MORE

Dining Out CLE Dec. 11

Gain insights for your restaurant and hospitality-industry clients at PBI's "Dining Out" CLE on Thursday, Dec. 11. This full-day CLE will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at The CLE Conference Center on the 10th Floor of the Wanamaker Building, Market and Juniper streets. A wine and cheese tasting and a sommelier to explain the origins and appropriate pairings for each of the wines follows the program. Many thanks to Tria for its sponsorship. Click here to register.

UM/UIM Motorist Coverage, Limited Tort CLE Dec. 17

Understand the basics of uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage in Pennsylvania and learn how to evaluate the limited tort plaintiff at a Wednesday, Dec. 17 CLE program. Attend in the morning, afternoon or all day. The program will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at The CLE Conference Center on the 10th Floor of the Wanamaker Building, Market and Juniper streets. Click here to register.




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YLD to Elect 7 to Executive Committee; Vote Today at Bellevue

Ten candidates are running for seven seats on the Young Lawyers Division Executive Committee in the Tuesday, Dec. 9 election.

The candidates are Ryan Briskin, Mario D'Adamo III, Caitlin M. Donnelly, Melanie J. Foreman, Dana Gittleman, Lindsay H. Schoonmaker, Ashley K. Shea, Franklin R. Strokoff, Thomas J. Szymanski and Anna B. Will. Executive Committee members serve three-year terms.

Balloting for members of the Young Lawyers Division Executive Committee will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 9, from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Ballroom Level of the Hyatt at The Bellevue, Broad and Walnut streets. Note: Only members in good standing of the Association's Young Lawyers Division may cast votes in this election. Attorneys are members of the Division if (1) they have not yet reached the age of 37, or (2) they have not yet reached the third anniversary of their first admission to the bar of any state.

Chancellor-Elect Albert S. Dandridge III, a partner with Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP, will outline his plans for 2015 at the Association's Annual Meeting Luncheon on Tuesday, Dec. 9.

Mark A. Aronchick, a shareholder in Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller and former Chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association, will be presented with the PNC Achievement Award at the Annual Meeting Luncheon, which begins at 12 p.m. at the Hyatt at The Bellevue, Broad and Walnut streets. Also at the event, the Justice William J. Brennan Jr. Distinguished Jurist Award will be presented to Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner. The Bar Association will also honor the winner of the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg "Pursuit of Justice" Legal Writing Competition.

YLD Holiday Party Dec. 16 at Four Seasons

The Young Lawyers Division Annual Holiday Party, Award Ceremony and Gift Drive will be Tuesday, Dec. 16 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at The Four Seasons Philadelphia, 1 Logan Square.

The Craig M. Perry Service Award will be presented to Kimberly Takacs of ACE Group. The F. Sean Peretta Service Award will be presented to Stephany Gordon of Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law. The Vision Award will be presented to The Legal Intelligencer. The event is sponsored by Kaplan Leaman & Wolfe Court Reporting & Litigation Support.

In conjunction with the Holiday Party, the YLD is coordinating a Holiday Gift Drive to benefit Project HOME and Cradles to Crayons. Since 1989, Project HOME has helped more than 8,000 people break the cycle of homelessness and poverty by providing a continuum of care that includes street outreach, supportive housing and comprehensive services that focus on health care, education and employment through both adult and youth education and enrichment programs at the Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs and community-based health care services.

Cradles to Crayons provides children from birth through age 12, living in homeless or low-income situations, with the essential items they need to thrive - at home, at school and at play. Cradles supplies these items free of charge by engaging and connecting communities that have with communities that need.

At the Holiday Party, the YLD will be accepting donations of new unwrapped toys. Please bring an unwrapped gift with you to the Holiday Party, and please encourage your colleagues and friends to do the same! The YLD will also collect small monetary donations (in any amount you can spare) at the holiday party in case you are unable to bring a toy.

If your firm would like to assist in our effort to provide holiday gifts for those less fortunate in our community, or if you would like more information about the holiday drive, please contact Phil Amoa at pamoa@mccarter.com.

Admission is $45 for YLD members, $55 for Bar Association members, $75 for non-members, $35 for YLD public interest or government attorney members and $25 for law student members. Admission includes open bar, passed hors d'oeuvres, burger and lobster roll sliders and Italian Market pasta station. Please note there will be a $10 increase for walk-ins at the door. Full refunds require 24 hours cancellation notice. Click here to register by Friday, Dec. 12.

Marketing Corner: Stay Focused to Achieve Goals in New Year, Part One

By Kimberly Alford Rice
The new year is just around the corner and it is an optimum time to reflect on 2014 and plan for a strong 2015.

One of the top habits of very successful lawyers is that they understand the value of planning for the future. An old axiom says that if we fail to plan we are certainly planning to fail. With life's distractions and overloaded calendars, it is essential to plan for your growing practice to build a prosperous practice.

• 7-10 touch points with prospects in a calendar year. What will they be?

• Monthly contact with active clients (even when there is not much activity in the case)

• Quarterly meetings with referral sources to maintain “top-of-mind” awareness for future referrals.

• Reputation-enhancing activities such as publishing, public speaking, charitable sponsorships and the like

• Other relationship-building activities such as targeted networking events, client lunch and learns and face-to-face meetings.

While I was coaching one of my clients recently, she questioned the value of planning when so many things outside her control arise that knock her off course. Spot-on concern to which I responded, "just think what would happen if you didn’t have goals set that may be modified slightly." Life happens and we must be flexible enough in our goal setting yet persistent in our pursuit of accomplishing them. What we know for sure is that goal-setting is the easy part. Most of us know what we must do. It's the "doing it" and the follow through that separates the successful lawyers from the ones who have good intentions but do not get off the ground.

To help you off to a strong start for the new year, we've outlined six steps you can take to get and stay focused for achieving your goals in 2015.

Set yourself up for success. Seek out an accountability partner to help stay focused on implementing your goals. Accountability is essential for keeping commitments. This may be a colleague in your firm, at a different firm, or a coach. Our clients repeatedly tell us "I know I must do what I commit to doing because I will be asked about it during my next coaching session."

Develop a SMART plan. That is to say, a well-crafted marketing plan is Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely. An example of a SMART goal would be to schedule coffee dates with six non-active clients in the first quarter of 2015 to check in on their business and whether there are any issues with which you may help them. Moreover, during this meeting, you will proactively ask for two referrals from each of the six clients. To break this goal down, you would need to have a face-to-face every two weeks over the next three months to meet this goal. Is this attainable and realistic for you?

In our next installment, we will continue to examine the six steps to make 2015 the best year yet.

Kimberly Alford Rice (kimberly@klamarketing.net) is principal of KLA Marketing Associates.

Applicants Sought for FJD Judicial Fellowship Program

Philadelphia judges are seeking to host law school graduates as judicial fellows to provide the graduates with substantive legal experience while benefitting the court system with additional legal talent, as part of the First Judicial District's Judicial Fellowship Program. Now in its fourth year, the Judicial Fellowship Program was created in 2011 to address the difficult hiring climate for lawyers that many recent law graduates were facing.

The Judicial Fellowship Program aims to provide high-caliber law graduates with substantive experience in the law, and to support the Court in carrying out key functions. Fellows volunteer their time, have the same responsibilities as regular paid judicial law clerks, and gain the benefit of training by judges in the Philadelphia courts. Judicial fellows' service helps our high-volume court system maintain its superior quality of service to the Philadelphia community. Judges help judicial fellows by mentoring and providing legal experience that will enhance their competitiveness for paid employment as new lawyers.

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Lisa M. Rau developed the program with help from Professor Chapin Cimino of Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law as well as faculty and administrators from career services offices at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Temple University Beasley School of Law. The Judicial Fellowship Program quickly expanded and now welcomes graduates from law schools from across the country. The Philadelphia Bar Association has been a constant supporter of the Judicial Fellowship Program.

The application process is streamlined and selective. Prospective judicial fellows apply directly via email to judges with whom they are interested in working. Judges select judicial fellows from those applicants who apply to them directly. The list of judges with available positions for judicial fellows is provided on the Judicial Fellowship Program's website. Each judge and fellow team designs a flexible schedule (minimum of 20 hours per week) that ensures reliable service to the judge but permits the fellow to seek a paid position elsewhere. Judicial fellows do not commit to any length of service enabling them to leave the fellowship with two weeks' notice to their judge upon obtaining paid employment.

As of September 2014, more than 61 judges have volunteered to host judicial fellows and the court has hosted 175 judicial fellows from 36 different law schools. The vast majority of judicial fellows who have left their fellowship departed for paid jobs using their legal skills.

For additional information and fellowship application forms, please visit www.courts.phila.gov/jfp

Summary of President's Immigration Order Dec. 11

Whether you represent individuals, employers, employees or a mixture of both, you should know and understand the potential impact of the president's Executive Order and the more settled impact of the extremely useful U.S. immigration "U" visa status.

Set aside for victims of certain qualifying crimes who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse and are helpful to law enforcement or government officials in the investigation, or prosecution of criminal activity (such as murder, manslaughter abduction, abusive sexual abduction, abusive sexual contact, blackmail, domestic violence, extortion, etc.) the U visa is now being utilized in workplace violation situations.

The program will be presented by the Immigration Law Committee and is co-sponsored by the ACE Committee, Civil Rights Committee, Corporate In-House Counsel Committee, Criminal Justice Section, Delivery of Legal Services Committee, LGBT Rights Committee and Women's Rights Committee.

The program will be held Thursday, Dec. 11 at 12 p.m. in the 11th Floor Conference Center at the Philadelphia Bar Association, 1101 Market St. Lunch is available for $8 for members of the Philadelphia Bar Association and $12 for non-members. Cancellations require 24 hour notice to receive a refund. Click here to register.

Joint Affinity Bar Holiday Party Dec. 9

Join the Asian Pacific Bar Association of Pennsylvania, The Barristers' Association of Philadelphia, Hispanic Bar Association of Pennsylvania, National Bar Association Women Lawyers' Division, South Asian Bar Association and Philadelphia Bar Association for the Joint Affinity Bar Holiday Party on Tuesday, Dec. 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Chima Brazilian Steakhouse, 1901 JFK Blvd.

Come out and join members of the affinity bar associations for a night of networking and celebrating the spirit of the holidays. Join us for this holiday party after the Philadelphia Bar Association
Annual Meeting Luncheon and Election. (Don't forget to vote!)

Through a partnership with Feel the Warmth, a nonprofit organization that collects donated new and nearly new children's items, donated items will be collected at the Holiday Party. Help us help others by bringing a new or nearly new children's coat or toys. Click here for more information.

The event is complimentary and all are welcome to attend. Registration is not required.

Public Interest Law Day CLE, Reception Dec. 10

The Public Interest Section will present its Annual Public Interest Law Day CLE program on Wednesday, Dec. 10 with an array of hot topics in public interest law for public interest attorneys, pro bono practitioners, judges and private practice attorneys who are interested in learning more about public interest law and cutting-edge issues affecting the pro bono legal community.

This full-day CLE program will offer 6 substantive and 2 ethics CLE credits and will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at The CLE Conference Center on the 10th Floor of the Wanamaker Building, Market and Juniper streets. Click here to register for the CLE program.

The opening panel presentation will address how a hypothetical family navigates changes in the law and policy in areas such as public benefits, same-sex marriage, prisoner rights and consumer housing. The closing plenary will feature a discussion on "The New Jim Crow In the City of Brotherly Love," and how the disproportionate number of people of color in the criminal justice system has affected people's civil access to justice.

Following the opening session, attendees will be able to attend two of the following six breakout sessions: Your Client and Their Debt: Understanding How Bankruptcy and Debt Collection Protections Affect Low-Income Clients; Individual Representation for System Change; Communication Challenges with Clients; Employment Law for the Non-Employment Practitioner; Voter ID: A Model for Integrating Advocacy and Litigation; and Vicarious Trauma and Attorney Burnout: Maintaining Effective Representation In the Midst of Client Crisis.

Immediately following the CLE program, the Public Interest Section will hold its Annual Awards Ceremony and Reception at the Philadelphia Marriott, 1201 Market St. The Awards Ceremony will begin at 5:30 p.m. and will feature the presentation of the Andrew Hamilton Award for distinguished service in public interest law. This year the Public Interest Section is delighted to present The Hon. Louis H. Pollak Award to Judge Edmund Spaeth (retired) of the Pennsylvania Superior Court, for his decades of service and work toward the public interest and access to justice.

The Awards Ceremony will also feature the selection of the Higginbotham Summer Fellowship, created 10 years ago to provide a stipend to support the work of a summer law intern at a Philadelphia Bar Foundation grantee organization. Third-year law students from local law schools will also be honored for their pro bono work with the presentation of the Annual Law Student Awards. The ceremony will also feature the announcement of 2013 recipients of the Morris Shuster Public Interest Loan Repayment Program by the Philadelphia Bar Foundation. The reception will follow the Awards Ceremony, featuring an open bar and heavy hors d'oeuvres. Click here to register for the reception.

Summary of President's Immigration Order Dec. 11

Whether you represent individuals, employers, employees or a mixture of both, you should know and understand the potential impact of the president's Executive Order and the more settled impact of the extremely useful U.S. immigration "U" visa status.

Set aside for victims of certain qualifying crimes who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse and are helpful to law enforcement or government officials in the investigation, or prosecution of criminal activity (such as murder, manslaughter abduction, abusive sexual abduction, abusive sexual contact, blackmail, domestic violence, extortion, etc.) the U visa is now being utilized in workplace violation situations.

The program will be presented by the Immigration Law Committee and is co-sponsored by the ACE Committee, Civil Rights Committee, Corporate In-House Counsel Committee, Criminal Justice Section, Delivery of Legal Services Committee, LGBT Rights Committee and Women's Rights Committee.

The program will be held Thursday, Dec. 11 at 12 p.m. in the 11th Floor Conference Center at the Philadelphia Bar Association, 1101 Market St. Lunch is available for $8 for members of the Philadelphia Bar Association and $12 for non-members. Cancellations require 24 hour notice to receive a refund. Click here to register.

Applicants Sought for FJD Judicial Fellowship Program

Philadelphia judges are seeking to host law school graduates as judicial fellows to provide the graduates with substantive legal experience while benefitting the court system with additional legal talent, as part of the First Judicial District's Judicial Fellowship Program. Now in its fourth year, the Judicial Fellowship Program was created in 2011 to address the difficult hiring climate for lawyers that many recent law graduates were facing.

The Judicial Fellowship Program aims to provide high-caliber law graduates with substantive experience in the law, and to support the Court in carrying out key functions. Fellows volunteer their time, have the same responsibilities as regular paid judicial law clerks, and gain the benefit of training by judges in the Philadelphia courts. Judicial fellows' service helps our high-volume court system maintain its superior quality of service to the Philadelphia community. Judges help judicial fellows by mentoring and providing legal experience that will enhance their competitiveness for paid employment as new lawyers.

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Lisa M. Rau developed the program with help from Professor Chapin Cimino of Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law as well as faculty and administrators from career services offices at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Temple University Beasley School of Law. The Judicial Fellowship Program quickly expanded and now welcomes graduates from law schools from across the country. The Philadelphia Bar Association has been a constant supporter of the Judicial Fellowship Program.

The application process is streamlined and selective. Prospective judicial fellows apply directly via email to judges with whom they are interested in working. Judges select judicial fellows from those applicants who apply to them directly. The list of judges with available positions for judicial fellows is provided on the Judicial Fellowship Program's website. Each judge and fellow team designs a flexible schedule (minimum of 20 hours per week) that ensures reliable service to the judge but permits the fellow to seek a paid position elsewhere. Judicial fellows do not commit to any length of service enabling them to leave the fellowship with two weeks' notice to their judge upon obtaining paid employment.

As of September 2014, more than 61 judges have volunteered to host judicial fellows and the court has hosted 175 judicial fellows from 36 different law schools. The vast majority of judicial fellows who have left their fellowship departed for paid jobs using their legal skills.

For additional information and fellowship application forms, please visit www.courts.phila.gov/jfp

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